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More details on education funding for Wisconsin in federal CARES Act

More details on education funding for Wisconsin in federal CARES Act

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) has compiled state-by-state estimates on what level of funding states might expect to receive from the most recent supplemental appropriations bill a/k/a the CARES Act. The bulk of the federal funding for K-12 education under the Act comes through the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund while a smaller allocation goes into what is called the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief Fund. 

If the assumptions used by the CRS in making its estimates are accurate, Wisconsin can expect to receive about $221.5 million from this legislation for potential use for K-12 education purposes; however, a portion of this estimated amount could also be used for higher education purposes.

For a more detailed breakdown and analysis of the funding and the permissible uses click here.

The state’s Legislative Fiscal Bureau has also prepared a memo on the CARES Act.

 

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More details on education funding for Wisconsin in federal CARES Act

Congress passes, President signs third ($2.2 Trillion) bill in response to COVID-19 epidemic

Following passage by the U.S. House today (3/27) on a voice vote, President Trump signed H.R. 748, the “Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act or the CARES”  Act into law this afternoon.

From the NSBA:

The $2 trillion CARES Act includes a $30 billion direct investment in education, including $3 billion to be allocated to governors and used at their discretion to address the emergency, $13.5 billion for K12 education, and $14.25 billion for postsecondary institutions. The bill also makes sizable investments in childcare, nutrition, homeless youth, and more, while also providing new waiver authority to the Secretary of Education, including for assessment and accountability waivers for states; and other ESSA waivers for states, tribes, and school districts. School districts will be able to use their share of the $13.5 billion K12 allocation – which will be allocated based on the proportion of Title I funding for the most recent fiscal year – for any purposes authorized by ESSA, IDEA, Perkins CTE, and other specified uses. Districts especially hard hit by the emergency should also contact their governor about securing potential additional funding out of their governor’s share of the $3 billion in flexible funding provide to state leaders.” 

The National School Boards Association (NSBA) also provided this analysis of all three supplemental appropriation (or emergency stimulus) bills enacted in response to the current Coronavirus pandemic.  

 

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NSBA federal update: K-12 provisions of COVID-19 emergency legislation

NSBA federal update: K-12 provisions of COVID-19 emergency legislation

The following is from the National School Boards Association (NSBA).  The U.S. Senate voted unanimously (96 to 0) yesterday evening to pass the measure. The House is expected to vote tomorrow.

“As you have probably heard, Congressional leaders and the White House appear to have reached agreement on a $2 trillion emergency supplemental spending bill.”

“The House is considering a number of options to vote on the legislation so they would not have to come back to Washington. One of the options includes moving the legislation through unanimous consent which does not require a vote. However, if there is a single objection, then House members may have to come back to DC and vote on the measure but other options including proxy voting and a voice vote on the floor by members present are also possibilities.

“But moving forward, here is what we know right now. The legislation contains $30.750 billion for an Education Stabilization Fund to assist states, school districts, and higher education institutions for costs related to the coronavirus pandemic. $13.5 billion is targeted to K-12 public schools with the remainder going to higher education, governors, and some special set asides. In addition to allocating emergency funding, the measure includes a number of policy provisions – including some waiver authority for the Secretary of Education – to help elementary, secondary, and postsecondary institutions navigate the crisis. This does not include IDEA waiver authority.

(more…)

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State will apply for federal assessment waiver; Gov. Evers orders DPI to suspend requirements

State will apply for federal assessment waiver; Gov. Evers orders DPI to suspend requirements

The United States Education Department (USED) recently announced flexibility will be provided to all states regarding the assessment and accountability requirements under federal law. 

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) announced in an email to district administrators that they will apply for a waiver from federal requirements to administer statewide assessments for accountability purposes. 

[UPDATE: The USED granted the assessment and accountability waiver the same day it was received. For more information click here and look under “Federal Waiver Update.”]

Also, yesterday (3/22) Gov. Evers announced the suspension of various rules at DPI to provide greater flexibility during the COVID-19 public health emergency. The Governor’s order relating to the DPI would do the following: (more…)

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More details on education funding for Wisconsin in federal CARES Act

Second coronavirus aid package passes Congress; Pres. Trump expected to sign it

The U.S. Senate today (3/18) passed the federal coronavirus aid package approved earlier this week by the U.S. House of Representatives.  The measure now goes to President Trump, who is expected to sign it. Senators voted 90-8 on the bill (H.R. 6201, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act) that had previously passed the House. 

The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates the measure will cost about $104 billion.  It is the second emergency supplemental appropriations package that Congress has passed amid growing concerns about the outbreak and the impact it is having on the U.S. economy. Today’s vote on the second package comes as senators are already working on a third supplemental appropriations package in response to the coronavirus pandemic that they hope to pass next week.  (more…)

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More details on education funding for Wisconsin in federal CARES Act

Federal legislation enacted so far in response to COVID-19

In a recent memo outlining Gov. Evers’ initial emergency order related to the current public health emergency, the nonpartisan Wisconsin Legislative Fiscal Bureau described the provisions of the new law passed by Congress last week and signed into law by President Trump:

“On March 6, 2020, President Trump signed P.L. 116-123, the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act, which provided $8.3 billion to fund federal and state actions to address the COVID-19 outbreak. 

“”Of the total, $2.2 billion is budgeted for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with the requirement that CDC provide at least $950 million to fund grants to, or cooperative agreements with, states, localities, territories, and tribes to carry out surveillance, epidemiology, expanding laboratory capacity, infection control, mitigation, communications, and other preparedness and response activities. CDC may use this funding to support eligible state expenses incurred beginning in January, 2020. The federal act requires that half of the funding allocated for local activities ($475 million) be allocated within 30 days of the enactment of the bill. (more…)

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